Once I was a clever boy learning the arts of Oxford... is a quotation from the verses written by Bishop Richard Fleming (c.1385-1431) for his tomb in Lincoln Cathedral. Fleming, the founder of Lincoln College in Oxford, is the subject of my research for a D. Phil., and, like me, a son of the West Riding.

I have remarked in the past that I have a deeply meaningful on-going relationship with a dead fifteenth century bishop...
It was Fleming who, in effect, enabled me to come to Oxford and to learn its arts, and for that I am immensely grateful.


Tuesday, 7 January 2014

Latest comments on the Franciscans of the Immaculate


I wrote before Christmas that the controversy around the Franciscans of the Immaculate (FFI) looked set to run and run as a story, whatever the truth of the situation. This is indeed what it is doing, and it is a story with, whatever your views of the FFI and the Commissioner, wider implications for the understanding of what is going on under the present Papacy in the Vatican.

Here are the two latest posts from New Catholic on Rorate Coeli - not, of course, noted for its warmth towards Papa Bergolio from the time of his election onwards - and whether you agree or disagree with the authors cited and their interpretation the posts do indicate a need for the central authorities of the Church to make clear what is or is not happening. Otherwise unnecessary confusion and speculation will have full rein, with all the consequences that flow therefrom.

The two posts, based on the views of two recognised and established commentators on the Vatican, Sandro Magister and Antonio Socci, can be read at:


and 

Antonio Socci: In the Vatican there is a NEW PROGRESSIVE INQUISITION, and their first victims are the Franciscans of the Immaculate

 

5 comments:

  1. I wonder if Rorate has considered that there are indeed some merits to Rome's intervention? It may be frivolous given problems elsewhere in the Church, but that does not mean there are not internal problems in the FFI.

    ReplyDelete
  2. There can be no justification for the suppression of the FFI. It is clearly extreme persecution. It is clear it is an attempt to destroy an orthodox, traditional, faithful order because of its great success.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. There are actually some serious problems with the FFI and their leadership which have not been made public yet. While the focus on them by Rome is hypocritical, given other problems in the church, it's not necessarily unmerited.

      Delete
    2. Are you a FFI? How do you know there are serious problems? That would be a calumny and defamation. After 6 months of destruction we are tired of calumnies and defamations.

      Delete
    3. I am not in the FFI but I have a friend who knows one of their superiors and another affiliated with Ecclesia Dei. Both independently confirm some serious issues with the FFI hierarchy, not so much with the regular friars.

      Delete